Car Mays: Project scenarios when considering what to do

May. 31, 2013 @ 04:18 PM

Quotes and sound bites are pretty much the same thing. They are used to make a point, or inject humor, or inspire, or for any number of other reasons.

I encountered a couple of quotes recently in which the sources said essentially the same thing, but made their points in very different ways as they projected possible outcomes in their lives.

The first quote makes a clear point, regardless of whether you do or don’t know anything about the speaker or the speaker’s subject. He said: “When considering the type of person I wanted to marry, I consciously wanted to find someone who had certain positive attributes of my mother, while making sure she didn’t have certain negative characteristics my mother possessed.”

The second quote makes a comparable point, and the point becomes clearer when you know something about the speaker and his subjects. Eddie Guiliani, world-class bodybuilder, now 77, said the following when bodybuilding and nutritional icon Joe Weider passed away this year at age 93:

“If I made any progress at all it was because of two people, Joe Weider and Bela Lugosi.”

As many of us know, Bela Lugosi (1882-1956) is the thin, pale iconic stage and horror film star who is best known for playing the title role in “Dracula,” the 1931 movie that is still shown on TV and in some theaters on special occasions.

When considering marriage, the first “quote maker” presented a best case/worst case scenario comparison based on observations and experiences with his mother. The second “quote maker” presented his best case/worst case scenario comparison based on a famous bodybuilder and on the epitome of a thin, pale human being.

This best case/worst case scenario projection is a good tool for any of us to use. When we are deciding what we should or shouldn’t do, or deciding when we should or shouldn’t do it, this type of comparison can play an important role. On our mentoring/coaching website, www.MyMerlin.net, which is based on the principles in “A Strategy For Winning,” a portion of the “Do It Now” principle reads: “Consider the rewards of doing what needs to be done and the consequences if you do not do it... In other words, consider the outcome if you do not do what needs to be done; and consider the outcome if you do accomplish your task...

“If the worst case scenario is not really bad, maybe you should just forget about the thing you have been procrastinating and invest your time in something that will result in greater rewards or value. If the worst case is really bad, then you should get on the ball, get with the program, and stop procrastinating. If the best case scenario shows great rewards or value, then it makes sense to quit procrastinating and do what needs to be done. If the best case shows little rewards or value, then maybe you should just forget about the thing you have been procrastinating and invest your time in something that will result in greater rewards or value.”

We can use the best case/worst case scenario thinking in numerous situations as we consider the various choices with which we deal in life. Whether in choosing marriage partners (like the first “quote maker”), taking care of our bodies (like the second “quote maker”), or anything else about which a decision needs to be made, the art of projecting possible outcomes is valuable.

— © 2013 by Carl Mays, speaker and author whose mentoring site, www.MyMerlin.net, is based on his book and program, “A Strategy For Winning.” E-mail to carlmays@carlmays.com, call 436-7478 or visit www.carlmays.com.